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Professional career advice for professionals

Sell Well Tomorrow: The Future Landscape of Sales and Marketing

The job landscape has been changing rather quickly these past few years. Our way of life is increasingly dependent on digital technology, which upgrades and innovates seemingly every week. Now, when people ask you, “Where do you see yourself in five years?” it’s not such an easy and straight-forward question to answer. Entire industries are quickly fading in the blink of an eye. Remember video rental stores? You’ll be lucky to find a single one standing these days. In their places, new ind

5 Signs You Should Say No to a Job Offer

So you think you’re done with the hard part: you’ve submitted your resume to several companies, gone through several rounds of interviews, [https://www.kalibrr.com/advice/2015/06/why-you-keep-getting-interviews-but-no-job-offers?utm_source=b2c-blog&utm_medium=in-text&utm_campaign=blog-CTA&utm_content=interviews-070616&ref=b2c-blog_free_blog-content] and you’ve even landed a job. Awesome! But here’s the harder part: you’re not sure if you’re going to accept the job. It’s natural to feel a lit

'Yes boss!': Quirky bosses and how to work with them

We all hear about horror stories about terror bosses [https://www.kalibrr.com/advice/2015/02/top-10-horrible-bosses-2/]and their questionable work ethic. But what if you have a competent boss that's just a bit off-kilter? How do you deal with a hippie vegetarian boss or a geeky introvert who's supposed to manage you? I'm sure you have had your fair share of bosses with quirky personalities. But if not, when you do encounter these bosses, at least you know what to do.The JesterHe was the class

#ToughQuestions: How to Talk About Your Previous Salary at a Job Interview

For the everyday employee, salaries are mostly treated with overwhelming secrecy. While we’re not James Bond, we treat it like a top-secret mission, often choosing only the closest of friends or co-workers to share such confidential information. But when you’re applying for a new job, the question is inevitably asked: “How much was your salary in your previous job?” This question often feels like a trap. What if your salary was under market value in your industry? Give away the exact number y

Sell Well Tomorrow: The Future Landscape of Sales and Marketing

The job landscape has been changing rather quickly these past few years. Our way of life is increasingly dependent on digital technology, which upgrades and innovates seemingly every week. Now, when people ask you, “Where do you see yourself in five years?” it’s not such an easy and straight-forward question to answer. Entire industries are quickly fading in the blink of an eye. Remember video rental stores? You’ll be lucky to find a single one standing these days. In their places, new ind

5 Signs You Should Say No to a Job Offer

So you think you’re done with the hard part: you’ve submitted your resume to several companies, gone through several rounds of interviews, [https://www.kalibrr.com/advice/2015/06/why-you-keep-getting-interviews-but-no-job-offers?utm_source=b2c-blog&utm_medium=in-text&utm_campaign=blog-CTA&utm_content=interviews-070616&ref=b2c-blog_free_blog-content] and you’ve even landed a job. Awesome! But here’s the harder part: you’re not sure if you’re going to accept the job. It’s natural to feel a lit

'Yes boss!': Quirky bosses and how to work with them

We all hear about horror stories about terror bosses [https://www.kalibrr.com/advice/2015/02/top-10-horrible-bosses-2/]and their questionable work ethic. But what if you have a competent boss that's just a bit off-kilter? How do you deal with a hippie vegetarian boss or a geeky introvert who's supposed to manage you? I'm sure you have had your fair share of bosses with quirky personalities. But if not, when you do encounter these bosses, at least you know what to do.The JesterHe was the class

#ToughQuestions: How to Talk About Your Previous Salary at a Job Interview

For the everyday employee, salaries are mostly treated with overwhelming secrecy. While we’re not James Bond, we treat it like a top-secret mission, often choosing only the closest of friends or co-workers to share such confidential information. But when you’re applying for a new job, the question is inevitably asked: “How much was your salary in your previous job?” This question often feels like a trap. What if your salary was under market value in your industry? Give away the exact number y

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