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Three Career Fields That Have Evolved Through Technology
For Professionals

Three Career Fields That Have Evolved Through Technology

By Braulio Giron, Jr. on July 16, 2019

Since the emergence of the computer, and subsequently the internet, almost every industry has changed in some way. And as industries change, so too do the careers within each

When electricity became widespread about a century ago, it significantly changed every single industry. Whether it’s healthcare, manufacturing, or the utilities industry itself, all of these became greatly supported by electricity. 

Digital advancements is today’s electricity. Be it via artificial intelligence, analytics, or the internet of things, rapidly evolving technology and related solutions continue to substantially transform different industries. 

Granted, new tech, like it always has, will result in the displacement of some jobs. However, it will also lead to the creation of not only new roles but possibly even new industries. And, at the least, continued technological advancements will evolve existing jobs, mostly by way of sub-specialties involving the new tools and solutions that are constantly being developed.

 

Medicine and Healthcare

There is perhaps no other industry that has changed more in the past decade or two than the medical industry. New technologies, like those in the fields of robotics and machine learning, have allowed present-day medical practitioners to pair their own expertise with intricate computer systems to achieve optimum results for patients. Similarly, new advances in chemical engineering technology have also helped pharmaceutical side of the healthcare industry to grow and expand.

The internet and related communications technology has also changed the way work is done in medicine and healthcare. A licensed optometrist for example, now has the ability to not only work at an eye clinic, but can also entertain the opportunity of serving as an Offshore Optometrist AND Optical Educator, who remotely provides training for complex optical concerns and use optical knowledge to support product and web teams of a large online retailer of eyeglasses and contact lenses that is based in another country.

The continued expansion of sub-professions, like that of aesthetic medicine, has also allowed medical practitioners to go beyond the typical hospital setting they sometimes get relegated into. New tech and solutions in the aforementioned aesthetic medicine for example, have allowed nurse to opt to work as an Infection Control Nurse in a specialized clinic,  identifying, preventing and controlling outbreaks of infection in a specialized facility.

See all Medicine and Healthcare opportunities on Kalibrr

 

Supply Chain Management

Supply chain management and its related processes have also changed significantly over the past several years. The continued advancement of tech has made the tracking and record-keeping of inventory and purchase orders more convenient for companies, and communication between supply chains has also become easier as a result of having numerous online platforms to send correspondence through.

Digitally savvy supply chain executives are in great demand among major companies, especially those with dealings overseas. Apart from knowing how to source parts and raw materials from around the world for use in manufacturing and other production, companies now also have to consider modern production technologies like 3D-printing. New solutions mean new skill requirements, and supply chain management is a career field which won’t stop evolving any time soon. Be it to account for raw materials, partially-made products, or those which are already finished, most major companies require supply chain professionals on their teams. 

Even firms handling hundreds to thousands of documents regularly need Materials Management Specialists, or those tasked to reviews procurement documents of items to be delivered, and prepare the needed documentation for the identification and assignment of purchased items, among others. Then there are the more recognizable Warehouse and Transport Managers, who in turn are responsible for maintaining receiving, warehousing, and distribution operations by initiating, coordinating, and enforcing program, operational, and personnel policies and procedures.

See all Supply Chain Management opportunities on Kalibrr

 

Marketing

As the internet has grown and expanded its features and functions, it has become increasingly common for websites and social media platforms to host advertisements and marketing materials. These days, just about every internet user is shown product recommendations, ads, and video testimonials for products several times each day. By expanding from traditional mass media into digital, modern marketing has allowed even smaller companies to compete with larger firms.

Between Hootsuite, Google Analytics, and the numerous other digital marketing tools that seemingly see no end in being improved or created, digital marketing is at this point a separate profession in itself. While marketing professionals have included digital in their skills and responsibilities, it’s complexities have allowed others to create entire businesses out of the profession, as client-companies want custom digital marketing strategies for their products or services. Then, with the digital marketing needs of each employer often varying, so too do their marketing professionals’ job titles and responsibilities. 

One company may have a Digital Content Strategist, who is primarily responsible for setting all digital strategies using tools like email, blogs, and social media. On the other hand, another company may employ a Brand Marketing Coordinator, who in turn also pursues digital marketing initiatives, but also has to coordinate with event organizers, media partners, sponsors, vendors, ambassadors/endorsers and other stakeholders to achieve these.

See all Marketing opportunities on Kalibrr

 

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